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Solving the PBW-like Problem for Enveloping Algebras of Direct Sums


Core Concepts
The authors solve the PBW-like problem of normal ordering for enveloping algebras of direct sums.
Abstract
The content discusses the problem of normal ordering for enveloping algebras of direct sums of Lie algebras. The key highlights are: The authors consider a Lie k-algebra g that can be written as a direct sum of two of its subalgebras, g = g1 ⊕ g2. They introduce the associated linear maps ji and pi such that j1p1 + j2p2 = Idg. The authors investigate the property that the map μstate, which allows multiplying members of U(g1) ⊗ U(g2) within U(g), is bijective. The authors construct a normal form calculator by defining an action g ∗ (t ⊗ m) on T(g1) ⊗ U(g2) that is compatible with the quotient map ψ1 : T(g1) → U(g1). They prove that this action g ∗ U extends to a Lie g-action on U(g1) ⊗ U(g2), and show that the map s : m → m ∗ (1 ⊗ 1) and μstate are mutually inverse, implying that μstate is bijective. The authors discuss potential future work on quantized enveloping algebras and Lie superalgebras.
Stats
The authors use the following key figures and metrics: g = g1 ⊕ g2 is a Lie k-algebra that can be written as a direct sum of two of its subalgebras. ji and pi are the associated linear maps such that j1p1 + j2p2 = Idg. μstate = μ ◦ (U(j1) ⊗ U(j2)) is the map that allows multiplying members of U(g1) ⊗ U(g2) within U(g).
Quotes
"We solve the PBW-like problem of normal ordering for enveloping algebras of direct sums." "The map μstate is bijective."

Key Insights Distilled From

by Géra... at arxiv.org 05-03-2024

https://arxiv.org/pdf/2405.01092.pdf
About enveloping algebras of direct sums

Deeper Inquiries

How can the techniques developed in this work be extended to study normal ordering problems in other algebraic structures beyond Lie algebras

The techniques developed in this work for studying normal ordering problems in enveloping algebras of direct sums can be extended to explore similar problems in various other algebraic structures. For instance, one could apply similar methods to investigate normal ordering in associative algebras, quantum groups, or even non-associative algebras. By adapting the concept of projectors, embeddings, and linear maps to suit the specific algebraic structure under consideration, one can potentially address normal ordering challenges in a broader range of algebraic contexts. This extension could lead to a deeper understanding of how normal ordering operates in diverse algebraic settings and provide insights into the underlying structures of these algebraic systems.

What are the potential applications of the bijective property of μstate in representation theory or other areas of mathematics

The bijective property of μstate has significant implications in representation theory and other mathematical areas. In representation theory, the bijectivity of μstate ensures that the multiplication map between enveloping algebras of direct sums is not only surjective but also injective. This property guarantees that every element in the target algebra can be uniquely expressed as a product of elements from the direct summands. Such bijectivity is crucial for establishing isomorphisms between different algebraic structures, which can simplify computations, aid in the classification of representations, and facilitate the study of symmetry properties in mathematical models. Moreover, in areas like quantum mechanics and mathematical physics, the bijective property of μstate can have applications in quantization procedures, operator algebra theory, and quantum information theory.

How might the insights from this work on enveloping algebras of direct sums inform our understanding of the structure and properties of more general tensor products of algebras

The insights gained from studying enveloping algebras of direct sums can offer valuable perspectives on the structure and properties of more general tensor products of algebras. By analyzing the construction of normal form calculators, establishing compatibility with universal constructions, and proving the bijective nature of certain maps, researchers can develop a deeper understanding of how tensor products behave in algebraic settings. This understanding can be extended to investigate tensor products in diverse mathematical contexts, such as category theory, algebraic geometry, and mathematical physics. The techniques and results obtained from this work can serve as a foundation for exploring the properties of tensor products in various algebraic structures, shedding light on their algebraic, geometric, and computational aspects.
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