toplogo
Sign In

Gastric Cancer Survival Disparities Among US Patients


Core Concepts
Survival outcomes in gastric cancer vary by race and ethnicity.
Abstract
The content discusses the survival differences in US patients with resected stage II or III gastric cancer based on race and ethnicity. TOPLINE: Asian and Hispanic patients show better overall survival than White and Black patients. METHODOLOGY: Researchers analyzed survival outcomes by race, ethnicity, treatment type, and other factors. Retrospective analysis included 6938 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Factors compared included race, ethnicity, surgical margins, lymph nodes, and treatment modality. TAKEAWAY: Perioperative chemotherapy linked to improved overall survival. Surgical resection alone, positive lymph nodes, and positive surgical margins decrease overall survival. Asian and Hispanic patients have better overall survival than White patients. IN PRACTICE: Asian and Hispanic race and ethnicity associated with improved overall survival. Asian and Black patients respond more favorably to neoadjuvant therapy. SOURCE: Research led by Steve Kwon, MD, MPH, published in JAMA Network Open. LIMITATIONS: Findings may be limited by the database used. DISCLOSURES: No funding or relevant financial relationships declared.
Stats
"Overall survival among US patients with resected stage II or III gastric cancer differs by race and ethnicity, with Asian and Hispanic patients demonstrating better overall survival than White and Black patients." "Just over half of the patients (53.6%) were White, 24.3% were Black, 17.8% were Hispanic, 15.8% were Asian, and 2.6% were other race or ethnicity." "Perioperative chemotherapy was associated with improved overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79)." "Asian and Hispanic patients had significantly better overall survival (HR, 0.64 and 0.77, respectively) than White patients." "Black patients who received neoadjuvant therapy had better overall survival than White patients (HR, 0.78)."
Quotes
"Asian and Hispanic race and ethnicity were independently associated with improved [overall survival] compared with Black and White race."

Deeper Inquiries

How can healthcare systems address the disparities in gastric cancer survival among different racial and ethnic groups

To address the disparities in gastric cancer survival among different racial and ethnic groups, healthcare systems can implement several strategies. Firstly, there should be a focus on increasing access to quality healthcare for all individuals, regardless of their race or ethnicity. This can involve targeted outreach programs to underserved communities, ensuring that individuals receive timely screenings and appropriate treatments. Additionally, healthcare providers should receive cultural competency training to better understand the unique needs and challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds. Research shows that disparities in outcomes can also be influenced by social determinants of health, such as socioeconomic status and access to care. Therefore, healthcare systems should work towards addressing these broader issues through policy changes and community partnerships. By taking a comprehensive and inclusive approach, healthcare systems can help reduce the disparities in gastric cancer survival rates among different racial and ethnic groups.

What factors might contribute to the differences in response to neoadjuvant therapy among Asian, Black, White, and Hispanic patients

Several factors may contribute to the differences in response to neoadjuvant therapy among Asian, Black, White, and Hispanic patients with gastric cancer. One key factor is genetic variability, as different racial and ethnic groups may have distinct genetic profiles that influence how they respond to treatments. Additionally, variations in tumor biology and molecular characteristics can impact the effectiveness of neoadjuvant therapy. Socioeconomic factors, such as access to healthcare and quality of care, can also play a role in treatment outcomes. Cultural beliefs and attitudes towards healthcare may affect patient adherence to treatment regimens and follow-up care. Furthermore, disparities in clinical trial participation and representation of diverse populations in research studies can lead to limited data on treatment efficacy in specific racial and ethnic groups. By considering these multifaceted factors, healthcare providers can tailor treatment approaches to better meet the needs of patients from different racial and ethnic backgrounds.

How can the findings of this research be applied to improve cancer treatment outcomes in other demographics

The findings of this research on gastric cancer survival disparities can be applied to improve cancer treatment outcomes in other demographics by informing personalized treatment approaches. Healthcare providers can use the insights gained from this study to develop more tailored treatment plans based on individual patient characteristics, including race and ethnicity. By recognizing the differential responses to neoadjuvant therapy among Asian, Black, White, and Hispanic patients, clinicians can adjust treatment strategies to optimize outcomes for each group. Additionally, the study highlights the importance of considering social determinants of health and access to care when designing cancer treatment programs. By addressing these factors and promoting equity in healthcare delivery, providers can enhance treatment effectiveness and overall survival rates across diverse patient populations. Furthermore, the research underscores the need for increased diversity in clinical trials and research studies to ensure that treatment guidelines are evidence-based and applicable to all demographics. By incorporating these learnings into clinical practice, healthcare systems can work towards reducing disparities and improving cancer treatment outcomes for all patients.
0