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Dynamic Passivation Strategies for Enhancing Perovskite Solar Cell Performance and Stability


Core Concepts
A dynamic covalent bond-based passivation strategy using a hindered urea/thiocarbamate Lewis acid-base material (HUBLA) can dynamically heal perovskite defects, leading to high-performance and stable perovskite solar cells.
Abstract
The article presents a novel passivation strategy for perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to address the challenge of controlling ionic defects in the perovskite photoactive layer during manufacturing and usage. The proposed approach utilizes a hindered urea/thiocarbamate bond-based Lewis acid-base material (HUBLA) that exhibits dynamic covalent bond characteristics. Key highlights: HUBLA can dynamically passivate defects in the perovskite layer upon exposure to moisture or heat, generating new passivating agents. This dynamic passivation strategy enabled the fabrication of high-performance PSCs with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 25.1%. HUBLA-based devices retained 94% of their initial PCE after approximately 1500 hours of aging at 85°C in N2 and maintained 88% of their initial PCE after 1000 hours of aging at 85°C and 30% relative humidity in air. The dynamic covalent bond characteristics of HUBLA allow for self-healing of the perovskite layer, leading to improved device performance and stability.
Stats
The perovskite solar cells fabricated with the HUBLA passivation strategy achieved a power conversion efficiency of 25.1%. The HUBLA-based devices retained 94% of their initial PCE for approximately 1500 hours of aging at 85°C in N2. The HUBLA-based devices maintained 88% of their initial PCE after 1000 hours of aging at 85°C and 30% relative humidity in air.
Quotes
"Upon exposure to moisture or heat, HUBLA generates new agents and further passivates defects in the perovskite." "This passivation strategy achieved high-performance devices with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 25.1%." "HUBLA devices retained 94% of their initial PCE for approximately 1500 hours of aging at 85 °C in N2 and maintained 88% of their initial PCE after 1000 hours of aging at 85 °C and 30% relative humidity (RH) in air."

Deeper Inquiries

How can the dynamic passivation mechanism of HUBLA be further optimized to achieve even higher performance and stability in perovskite solar cells?

To enhance the dynamic passivation mechanism of HUBLA for improved performance and stability in perovskite solar cells, several optimization strategies can be considered. Firstly, the molecular structure of HUBLA can be fine-tuned to increase its affinity towards specific defect sites within the perovskite layer, thereby enhancing the passivation efficiency. Additionally, exploring different Lewis acid-base materials with varying properties and reactivity could lead to the development of novel passivation agents that offer superior performance compared to HUBLA. Furthermore, optimizing the concentration and distribution of HUBLA within the perovskite layer can help ensure uniform passivation of defects, leading to enhanced device performance and stability. Implementing advanced characterization techniques such as in-situ spectroscopy and microscopy can provide valuable insights into the dynamic passivation process, enabling further optimization of HUBLA-based passivation strategies.

What are the potential limitations or drawbacks of the HUBLA-based passivation strategy, and how can they be addressed?

While the HUBLA-based passivation strategy shows promising results in improving the performance and stability of perovskite solar cells, there are potential limitations and drawbacks that need to be addressed. One limitation is the potential degradation of HUBLA over extended periods, which could reduce its passivation efficiency and impact device stability. To address this, research efforts could focus on developing more robust and durable Lewis acid-base materials that exhibit enhanced stability under prolonged exposure to environmental factors. Another drawback is the possible impact of HUBLA on the optical and electronic properties of the perovskite layer, which could affect device performance. By conducting comprehensive studies on the interaction between HUBLA and the perovskite layer, researchers can optimize the passivation strategy to minimize any adverse effects on device performance.

What other types of dynamic covalent bond-based materials could be explored for perovskite solar cell passivation, and how might their properties differ from HUBLA?

In addition to HUBLA, several other types of dynamic covalent bond-based materials could be explored for passivating defects in perovskite solar cells. For example, dynamic imine bonds, disulfide bonds, or boronic ester bonds could be investigated for their potential in passivating ionic defects within the perovskite layer. These materials may offer distinct properties such as different reactivity towards specific defect sites, varying bond strengths, and unique self-healing capabilities. By exploring a diverse range of dynamic covalent bond-based materials, researchers can identify novel passivation strategies that offer improved performance and stability for perovskite solar cells. Conducting comparative studies on the passivation efficiency and long-term stability of these materials can provide valuable insights into their suitability for enhancing the performance of perovskite solar cells.
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